Richard Hooker Annotated Bibliography

Primary Sources

Hooker, Richard. Of the Lawes of Ecclesiasticall Politie. 1593 (Books I-IV), 1597 (Book V), 1648 (Books VI, VIII), 1662 (Book VII).

The Laws is of course Hooker’s magnum opus, and it is almost an understatement to call it that, given how far it towers over his other worthy writings in length, fame, and comprehensiveness. Although people often ask whether there is an easier entry point into Hooker’s thought than undertaking this massive tome (or trio of tomes, as usually printed), there really isn’t. And given how he has structured the work, there is nothing better to do than start at the beginning and continue sequentially through at least Book V; after that, Books VI, VII, and VIII, incomplete as they are, can be read singly without great loss. There are many editions of the Laws that have appeared through the centuries; the key ones to be aware of are as follows.

Keble, John, ed. The Works of that Learned and Judicious Divine Mr. Richard Hooker: with an Account of His Life and Death by Isaac Walton. 3 vols. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1836.

This was the first complete critical edition of Hooker’s works, and although scholars now do not concur with all of Keble’s judgments and editorial choices (and generally agree that his readings of Hooker’s theology in his introduction are tendentious at points where Keble tried to bring Hooker in line with the Oxford Movement), it remains a worthy one. Keble’s edition formed the basis for later 19th-century editions, of which the 1888 Oxford edition, revised by R.W. Church and Francis Paget, is the most important. It was the standard text for nearly 100 years until supplanted by the Folger edition, and, being out of copyright, is available for free online at the Online Library of Liberty (http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/hooker-the-works-of-that-learned-and-judicious-divine-mr-richard-hooker), and in inexpensive facsimile reprints.

Hill, W. Speed, and Georges Edelen, eds. The Folger Library Edition of the Works of Richard Hooker, vol. 1: The Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity: Pref., Books I to IV. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1977.

Hill, W. Speed, ed. The Folger Library Edition of the Works of Richard Hooker, vol. 2: The Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity: Book V. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1977.

Hill, W. Speed, and P.G. Stanwood, eds. The Folger Library Edition of the Works of Richard Hooker, vol. 3: The Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity: Books VI, VII, VIII. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1981.

The monumental Folger Library Edition of Hooker’s works, supervised heroically by W. Speed Hill for over two decades, is the gold standard and is likely to remain so for some time. These handsome and sturdy volumes are suitable for non-specialist readers even while containing a wealth of critical apparatus that should suffice for the most intensive historical researcher. However, since faithfulness to the original text is their number one goal, they use all the original spelling and punctuation, which can be quite challenging until you get used to it. They are also fantastically expensive unless you happen to find a great bargain in a used bookstore.

McGrade, Arthur Stephen, ed. Of the Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity: A Critical Edition with Modern Spelling. 3 vols. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013.

Instead of attempting to reinvent the wheel that the Folger Library Edition had so carefully shaped, McGrade’s edition seeks to fuse the demands of critical scholarship with accessibility to general audiences. The task is a challenging one, and not all will be satisfied; die-hard researchers will probably still prefer the Folger for some purposes, while a popular-level readership will complain that if the text was really to be made accessible, more needs to be changed than just the archaic spelling—punctuation and price being two key obstacles. That said, the updated spelling will be a big help for many readers, and McGrade’s lengthy introduction is really first-rate, bringing to bear the fruits of four decades of groundbreaking Hooker scholarship that the Folger Edition catalyzed. With OUP’s dominance in the field, this may well replace the Folger Edition as the standard in the next decade. My full review of this volume can be found in the Spring 2014 issue of the University Bookman.

Hill, W. Speed, and John E. Booty, eds. The Folger Library Edition of the Works of Richard Hooker, vol. 4: Of the Lawes of Ecclesiasticall Politie: Attack and Response. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1982.

The fourth volume of the Folger Edition contains some really indispensable material for any serious student of Hooker: the anonymous Christian Letter of Certaine English Protestants that took Hooker to task for Books I-V of the Laws in 1599, and Hooker’s unpublished responses. These responses include Hooker’s memorable marginal notes upon the text of the Christian Letter itself, some notes and outlines for the planned response, and the collected fragments of the carefully-worded response, known as the Dublin Fragments. By far the largest section of the Fragments is addressed to predestination and related issues, and displays Hooker at his most scholastic and sophisticated, a virtuosic theological performance, though one whose precise interpretation remains disputed. A fair bit of this material appears at the end of vol. 2 of the 1888 edition.

Hill, W. Speed, and Laetitia Yeandle, ed. The Folger Library Edition of the Works of Richard Hooker, vol. 5: Tractates and Sermons. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1990.

The fifth volume of the Folger Edition contains perhaps Hooker’s most-loved work, the Learned Discourse on Justification, a series of three sermons preached at the Temple Church during his controversy with Travers. These sermons contain a masterful exposition of the Protestant doctrine of justification in distinction from the Roman Catholic doctrine, and a careful assessment of what this difference means for the salvific status of Roman Catholics. Also in this volume are his earliest work (probably from 1582), Two Sermons Upon Part of Saint Jude’s Epistle, the Learned and Comfortable Sermon of the Certainty and Perpetuity of Faith in the Elect, A Learned Sermon on the Nature of Pride, and the funeral sermon, A Remedy Against Sorrow and Fear. This volume also contains documents related to the Hooker-Travers controversy: Travers’s Supplication to the Privy Council and Hooker’s Answer to the Supplication. All of these are valuable for getting a fuller picture of Hooker’s theology, and the sermons are fine examples of his rhetoric and his pastoral concerns, especially those on justification and on the Certainty and Perpetuity of Faith in the Elect. Much of this material can also be found at the end of vol. 3 of the 1888 edition.

Hill, W. Speed, ed. The Folger Library Edition of the Works of Richard Hooker, vol. 6: Of the Lawes of Ecclesiastical Politie, Books I-VIII: Introductions and Commentary. Binghamton, NY: Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies, 1993.       

The sixth volume (actually printed in two volumes, 6(1) and 6(2)) of the Folger Edition, as its subtitle suggests, does not contain additional writings by Hooker but merely editorial introductions and commentary. Although frequently useful and illuminating, this material is not always to be trusted, with a number of claims needing to be revised substantially in light of all of the new scholarship that has appeared since. It is certainly not always the case that the newest scholarship is the best, but I think that if one compares, these 1993 introductions and commentary with, say, the 2008 Brill Companion to Richard Hooker, the latter represents a substantial improvement on most points.

Whitgift, John. Whitgift’s Works. Edited by John Ayre. 3 vols. Cambridge: Parker Society, 1849–51.

Although it can be awfully tedious reading, the 1570s Admonition Controversy between conformist John Whitgift and Puritan Thomas Cartwright is essential background for understanding Hooker’s context and writings. The full exchange, with the exception of Cartwright’s Second Replie (1575) and Rest of the Second Replie (1577) can be found in this fine nineteenth-century edition.

 

Reference Works

Hill, W. Speed, ed. Studies in Richard Hooker; Essays Preliminary to An Edition of His Works. Cleveland: Press of Case Western Reserve University, 1972.

This collection of essays stands at the beginning of the long and fruitful renaissance in Hooker scholarship that the Folger project initiated. As such, most of these essays are dated, and some have become virtual whipping boys for later scholarship (such as H.C. Porter’s contribution), but others remain relevant. Edelen’s, on “Hooker’s Style” is well-worth reading, and W.D.J. Cargill Thompson’s “Philosopher of the ‘Politic Society’,” was, like most of this great scholar’s writings, something of a masterpiece, and proved immensely stimulating for subsequent Hooker research. (Both of these appear in the main bibliography below).

McGrade, Arthur Stephen, ed. Richard Hooker and the Construction of Christian Community. Tempe, AZ: Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies, 1997.

This was the first of three collections of essays by Hooker scholars to appear in a little over a ten-year span. Like many such collections, it suffers from being a bit scattershot, both in terms of the topics covered and the interpretive perspectives represented. With a couple of exceptions, though, the essays are very useful treatments of their respective topics, with Neelands’s essay on scripture, reason and tradition (see below), and those by Collinson, Almasy, Kirby, Shuger, and Williams particularly worth reading.

Kirby, W.J. Torrance, ed. Richard Hooker and the English Reformation. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2003.

This volume, which includes many of the same contributors as the McGrade volume, suffers from the same scattered selection of topics, although there is a bit more unity overall in the scholarly perspectives being represented. The majority of the essays in this volume are well-worth reading, with important treatments of predestination, and of ecclesiology and sacraments in particular. Unfortunately, it is (compared to the McGrade volume) rather expensive and hard to come by.

Kirby, W.J. Torrance, ed. A Companion to Richard Hooker. Leiden: Brill, 2008.

This is the first collection of essays on Hooker organized according to an overarching topical scheme, proceeding in orderly fashion from Hooker’s life, his works, his sources, and his rhetoric and then through a range of key theological issues (moving, in very Reformational logic, from soteriology, to Scripture, to ecclesiology, to church polity). The contributors invited represent almost all the leading names in recent Hooker scholarship, and the essays are almost uniformly excellent and judicious (although I certainly have quibbles with a few). In particular, Ingalls’ essay on “Sin and Grace,” Neelands’s essay on “Predestination,” Shuger’s essay on “Faith and Assurance,” and Neelands’s essay on “Christology and Sacraments” (all of which appear below in this annotated bibliography), are perhaps the finest treatments of and introductions to their respective issues currently available. Despite the hefty price tag, this volume is indispensable for the serious student of Richard Hooker.

Kindred-Barnes, Scott, and W. Bradford Littlejohn, eds. Richard Hooker and Reformed Orthodoxy. Reformed Historical Theology series. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck and Ruprecht, forthcoming 2016.

This collection of essays which I have had the privilege of helping edit, should be published next year, and promises to include, if I do say so myself, some really groundbreaking scholarship on the question of Hooker’s relationship to the Reformed tradition. It arose out of a sense that most Hooker scholarship had failed to undertake any kind of thorough comparison of Hooker with his contemporaries, especially on the Continent, and that continental Reformed historical theology had been almost uniformly inattentive to Hooker as an important point of comparison. The essays by Lynch, Fulford, and Baschera in particular (all cited below in the regular bibliography) shed new light on some of the most hotly contested issues in Hooker interpretation, with respect to his doctrines of Scripture, justification, and predestination.

 

Other Secondary Literature

Atkinson, Nigel. Richard Hooker and the Authority of Scripture, Tradition and Reason: Reformed Theologian of the Church of England? Vancouver: Regent College Publishing, 2005.

This popular-level treatment of Hooker’s theology, aimed self-consciously at an evangelical Anglican audience, was an attempt to distill the insights of Torrance Kirby’s reinterpretation of Hooker’s theology—i.e., that Hooker was no “third way” between Rome and Geneva, but self-consciously in line with the magisterial Reformers—for the sake of general audiences. Although it is fairly useful for that purpose, unfortunately, this meant that some of the nuance and sophistication of Kirby’s argument was lost, and some points were poorly expressed or even just plain incorrect. Accordingly, Atkinson has become something of a whipping-boy for Hooker scholars intent on discrediting Kirby’s interpretation, which is unfair, to say the least, given that this was essentially a popular-level exposition. Given that Kirby’s prose is almost always dense and uninviting, this book may he helpful for those wanting to get the gist of his early work in an accessible form.

Avis, P.D.L. The Church in the Theology of the Reformers. Atlanta: John Knox Press, 1981.

Thirty-four years on, still a classic, and my go-to recommendation for introducing people to Protestant ecclesiology. Avis’s treatments of the notae ecclesiae and of the Christian magistrate are particularly useful (even if oversimplified, as one might expect in a work like this), and have been a great aid to my own research and writing.

Brachlow, Stephen. The Communion of Saints: Radical Puritan and Separatist Ecclesiology, 1570–1625. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988.

Although not engaging with Hooker himself, Brachlow’s book is an invaluable look at the mindset and ecclesiology that drove Hooker to write the Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity. He shows how the emphasis on purity and quest for assurance of salvation among many radical Puritans resulted in a certain erosion of the gap between the concepts of the visible and invisible church.

Collinson, Patrick. The Elizabethan Puritan Movement. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1967.

Although nearly five decades old, this is probably still the best one-volume treatment of its fascinating subject area. Collinson, even at this early point in his illustrious career, was an extraordinary attentive and perceptive scholar and an unusually engaging writer. Many details of his interpretations and narrative have been since challenged or revised by his students and followers, but this is still a great place to go to get the overall storyline of the Elizabeth Puritan movement, and as such, essential background reading for understanding Hooker.

Collinson, Patrick. The Religion of Protestants: The Church in English Society, 1559–1625. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1982.

This published version of Collinson’s 1979 Ford lectures offered a comprehensive reassessment of the basic shape of the English church during the Elizabethan and Jacobean eras, showing that it was both less dysfunctional and rather more Reformed than it had been traditionally seen, with the rival parties of “Anglican” and “Puritan” being something of an optical illusion created by the polemical literature left to us. These essays are delightfully rich in detail and anecdote, and Collinson is a master of his literary craft.

Gibbs, Lee W. “Richard Hooker: Prophet of Anglicanism or English Magisterial Reformer?” Anglican Theological Review 84 (2002): 943–60.

This essay offers a good example of the pushback by interpreters wed to the old via media reading of Hooker against Kirby and his disciples. The argument, it must be confessed, is exceedingly weak, but it offers a good sketch of the battle lines.

Ingalls, Ranall. “Sin and Grace.” In Kirby, ed., A Companion to Richard Hooker, pp. 151–84.

As mentioned above, this is probably the best one-stop-shop treatment of Hooker’s soteriology that you can find. It certainly does not solve every interpretive question, and Nigel Voak in particular might want to say a thing or two by way of rejoinder, but it offers a close and sympathetic reading of Hooker’s writings on the thorny topics of justification and predestination in light of his historical and theological context.

Joyce, A. J. Richard Hooker and Anglican Moral Theology. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012.

This is, somewhat shockingly, the first book-length treatment of Hooker’s moral theology, which is really a more substantial focus of the Laws than dogmatic theology. As such, it is a very important volume, thorough, well-organized, and particularly useful for its extensive comparisons of Hooker with Aquinas. However, its value is vitiated somewhat by Joyce’s constant potshots at Kirby and Atkinson, particularly in her very problematic chapter on Hooker’s polemics, which I deal with at length in chapter five of this book. Also, it is unfortunate that Joyce makes almost no effort to compare Hooker to his contemporary moral theologians, both among Puritans or continental Reformed theologians. My full review of this book can be found in the Fall 2013 issue of the Anglican Theological Review.

Kirby, W. J. Torrance. Richard Hooker’s Doctrine of the Royal Supremacy. Leiden: Brill, 1990.

This book landed like something of a grenade in the crowded field of Hooker scholarship in the 1990s, and has proven immensely stimulating for further research since. Its key thesis, as discussed in chapter one of this book, is that Hooker self-consciously identified with the basic theological consensus of the magisterial reformers on matters of soteriology and ecclesiology, and should be read as taking the Puritans to task not so much for being too Reformed, but for being insufficiently Reformed. Although overstating his case and oversimplifying on some points, much of Kirby’s thesis has held up well over the past twenty-five years, with his insight into the Protestant two-kingdoms doctrine, and Hooker’s adaptation of it, being particularly significant (especially for my own research).

Kirby, W.J. Torrance. Richard Hooker, Reformer and Platonist. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2005.

In this collection of loosely-connected essays, Kirby broadens, deepens, and nuances his basic reading of Hooker’s Reformational theology. In particular, here and in his subsequent work, Kirby draws attention to the neo-Platonic roots of elements of Hooker’s theological vision, and his ongoing attempt, following scholastics like Aquinas, to both hold together and rightly distinguish the operations of nature and grace.

Lake, Peter. Anglicans and Puritans? Presbyterianism and English Conformist Thought From Whitgift to Hooker. London: Unwin Hyman, 1988.

As described in chapter one of this book, Lake’s Anglicans and Puritans offered a bold and profoundly influential re-reading of Hooker’s Elizabethan context and the trajectory of Hooker’s own theological work. Key to Lake’s re-interpretation was (a) an insistence that moderate Puritan ideas were right at the mainstream of the Elizabethan church, (b) that Hooker was not only dissatisfied with Puritanism, but also with what he saw as the inadequate theology and practice of its conformist critics, and (c) that knowing himself to be an innovator, Hooker was deliberately ambiguous and evasive in some of his theological formulations. Although (a) and (b) have been substantially confirmed by other scholarship, a great many of the particular readings of Hooker’s own theology that Lake offers have not withstood the test of careful scrutiny, and Lake has not added a great deal in his few subsequent essays on Hooker. Such is Lake’s stature within the field, however, that his overall portrait has retained great influence over recent scholars.

Lewis, C. S. English Literature in the Sixteenth Century, Excluding Drama. The Oxford History of English Literature, vol. 3. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1954.

This volume is one of those delightful proofs that newer scholarship is not necessarily better scholarship. Although less than thirteen pages in length (from pp. 451-63), Lewis’s treatment of Hooker may still be the best single summary of his style, thought, and of the Laws in particular that you can find, and I never hesitate to recommend it to people looking for a quick introduction to Hooker. Lewis captures Hooker in an elegant nutshell, and also, in pp. 438-50, contextualizes him admirably against the backdrop of Puritan-conformist polemics.

Littlejohn, W. Bradford. The Freedom of a Christian Commonwealth:Richard Hooker and the Problem of Christian Liberty. Emory University Studies in Law and Religion. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, forthcoming 2016.

This will be the published form of my doctoral dissertation, completed at the University of Edinburgh in 2013. In it, I try to situate Hooker’s work against the backdrop of Protestant struggles over Christian liberty, adiaphora, and the relative authorities of magistrate and minister, that had been generated by Luther’s repudiation of papal authority and insistence on the “freedom of a Christian.” The result, I think, is the most thorough treatment of Hooker’s political theology to appear in several decades. I also seek to show how the issues Hooker wrestled with, and the solutions he attempted to formulate, are of enduring relevance for Christians today reasoning about freedom in contemporary pluralistic societies.

Littlejohn, W. Bradford. “The Search for a Reformed Hooker: Some Modest Proposals.” Reformation and Renaissance Review 16:1 (2015): 68–82.

In this article, you will find some of the same arguments presented in chapters four and five of this book, as I attempt to describe the current state of Hooker scholarship with relation to the question of Hooker’s Reformed identity, and to point a way forward through the debate. In particular, I call for more thorough comparative studies of Hooker’s Reformed contemporaries, and for more careful attention to the relationship of his polemicism and irenicism.

MacCulloch, Diarmaid. The Later Reformation in England, 1547–1603. Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan, 2001.

———. Reformation: Europe’s House Divided, 1490–1700. London: Allen Lane, 2003.

With these two books, Diarmaid MacCulloch rapidly established himself first as the foremost historian of the English Reformation, and then as the foremost historian of the Reformation in general. Although his interpretations of Hooker himself are not always spot-on, and he is not, in any case, a historical theologian per se, these are both admirable, narrative-driven introductions to their subject matter, written in vigorous, engaging prose.

Miller, Charles. Richard Hooker and the Vision of God: Exploring the Origins of ‘Anglicanism’. Cambridge: James Clarke & Co, 2013.

Miller’s book constitutes an impressive recent attempt to summarize Hooker’s theological contribution for (relatively) general audiences, though he has Anglican seminarians and priests particularly in mind. As such, it is quite useful for those looking for an introduction, and it covers a wider range of topics than those treated in my own book here. However, Miller’s book suffers from a recurrent lack of clarity, not least in his desire to sit noncommittally astride the rival Kirby and Lake interpretations of Hooker’s thought. My full review can be found in the Journal of Anglican Studies online book reviews (2014).

Neelands, W. David. “Hooker on Scripture, Reason, and ‘Tradition’.” In McGrade, ed., Richard Hooker and the Construction of Christian Community, pp. 75–94.

———. “Predestination.” In Kirby, ed., A Companion to Richard Hooker, pp. 185–220.

———. “Christology and the Sacraments.” In Kirby, ed., A Companion to Richard Hooker, pp. 369–402.

David Neelands is one of the most careful, judicious, and consistently high-quality scholars on Hooker currently writing, and in fact he has been publishing on Hooker for over a quarter-century. Although never the final word (is there such a thing in historical scholarship?), his essays on any given topic have a way of becoming the definitive, go-to treatment of that topic, without being dogmatic or partisan. These three are all good examples, and I would commend them to anyone wanting a good introduction to any of these three subjects in Hooker’s thought.

O’Donovan, Joan Lockwood. Theology of Law and Authority in the English Reformation. Emory University Studies in Law and Religion 1. Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1991.

Belying its remarkable conciseness, this book is profound and wide-ranging, offering probably the best sustained treatment of its stated topic currently available. There is an excellent chapter on Cartwright and the Puritans, and another excellent closing chapter on Hooker’s political thought, although I have a number of friendly differences with some of her readings.

Shuger, Debora K. “Faith and Assurance.” In Kirby, ed., A Companion to Richard Hooker, pp. 221–50.

Shuger is one of the most careful and attentive scholars of English theological literature during this period, and this essay is excellent proof of that. She does an excellent job of situating Hooker’s recurrent concern with the issues of assurance and certainty, of faith vs. knowledge, in the context of earlier Reformational and Puritan writings on the issue. The result is a lucid treatment of the ways in which Hooker stands both in continuity and discontinuity from many of his Reformed predecessors on this important topic.

Thompson, W. D. J. Cargill. “The Philosopher of the ‘Politic Society’: Richard Hooker As Political Thinker.” In Hill, ed., Studies in Richard Hooker, pp. 3–76. Republished in W.D.J. Cargill Thompson, Studies in the Reformation: Luther to Hooker. Edited by C. W. Dugmore. London: Athlone Press, 1980.

Although over forty years old, this remains one of the very best treatments of Hooker’s political thought, and indeed of what he was up to in the Laws as a whole. Thompson grasps the connection between Hooker’s ecclesiology and political theory in a way that presaged some of the later insights of Kirby, although without, unfortunately, relating them to the larger backdrop of the Lutheran two-kingdoms doctrine (surprisingly, since Thompson also wrote a famous essay on this topic).

Verkamp, Bernard J. The Indifferent Mean: Adiaphorism in the English Reformation to 1554. Athens, OH: Ohio University Press, 1977.

This obscure and rarely-cited book is an indispensable guide to the all-important topic of adiaphora, “things indifferent,” and the role they played in the soteriology, epistemology, ecclesiology, and most importantly, political theology of the English Reformation. However, Verkamp also shows, unlike other scholars of the topics, that the uses of this doctrine in the English Reformation were substantially continuous with its role in the Lutheran and Zwinglian reformations. My own dissertation work drew heavily on Verkamp’s insights.

Voak, Nigel. Richard Hooker and Reformed Theology: A Study of Reason, Will, and Grace. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003.

Nigel Voak’s book represents by far the most sophisticated and sustained attempt to grapple with the question of Hooker’s relationship to the Reformed tradition, at least on the central issues of reason, will, and grace (which were later to boil over in the Arminian controversy). He has extended the inquiries in this book in a number of subsequent journal articles. Two weaknesses render Voak’s work less valuable than it might otherwise be, though, and cast into question some of his conclusions: first, his methodology of reading between the lines, even when it contradicts Hooker’s explicit claims, and second, his failure (particularly in this book) to look closely at Hooker’s Reformed contemporaries. Nonetheless, this book remains central to the conversation over Hooker’s theological identity.

2 thoughts on “Richard Hooker Annotated Bibliography

  1. Kenneth R. Cook

    Thank you for this bibliography. I missed your lecture at St. Mark’s Reformed Episcopal Church, Jenkintown, PA on October 2nd, but have just finished reading your Richard Hooker: A Companion to His Life and Work. I did a Th.M. thesis on Hooker’s adiaphorism at Westminster Theological Seminary (with help from Verkamp and others) in 1981. I have spent the last 35 years in pastoral ministry (Episcopal; since 2001, Anglican) and have only been able to observe the developments within Hooker scholarship from afar. Thank you aiding me in something of a reentry. Yours in Christ, Ken Cook

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  2. Kenneth R. Cook

    I rejoice in the fact that Richard Hooker is being studied and appreciated by scholars outside of the Anglican tradition. As recently as the early 1980s, that was not the case.

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